Okanagan Panorama

  

Ranting Makes Right ... or Does it? Writing Resonating Rants that Rock! by Rae StonehouseI read an article the other day, doesn’t really matter which one, that really grabbed my attention and engaged me. 

As I continued to read, the realization came to me that this wasn’t the self-help or informative style of article that I usually sought out. Oh no … it was a rant! A rant, thinly disguised as expert advice.  

I enjoy a good rant. Rick Mercer, of CBC’s the Mercer Report, is turning ranting into an art. His rants are fast paced, always have a recognizable target and are easy to follow. Even if you haven’t heard of the facts or evidence that he backs his argument up with, it leaves you wondering about what he has said and eager to find out more on your own.

The author of the article broke the rules of ranting, saying that anyone that disagreed with his ‘facts’ was stupid, making it personal to me. That got me thinking about rants in general. Are there any rules when writing or orally delivering a rant? Does the end justify the means? Is this another ‘might vs right’ scenario? Does good taste come into play when delivering a rant, or is it a ‘no holds barred, anything goes’ type of scenario?

Since rants seem to becoming more common, I thought it might be interesting to research best practices on how to rant with the best of them.

Vocabulary.com describes rant as follows:  A rant is an argument that is fuelled by passion, not shaped by facts. When the shouting starts on talk radio, or when a blog commenter resorts to ALL CAPS — you're almost certainly encountering an instance of ranting.

Published in Communication Skills